Investment Theory #21: Klarman’s 1999 Letter

I’ve been awol while studying for the CFA. With level 3 hopefully behind me, I’m going to get back into the habit of writing. Let’s jump back into our series on the 1990’s with Seth Klarman’s letters as our guide to the period.

Klarman is a well-respected value investor who founded the Baupost Group in 1982. Since then he has generated an average annual return of 19%. Klarman’s investing philosophy can be summed up by the title of his book Margin of Safety: Risk-Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor.

This series of posts will reflect on Klarman’s activity during the period 1995 to 2001. Links to past posts: 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998

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Economics #7: Rent vs Buy

Lately and frequently, the topic of homeownership has been popping up in my life. I don’t know if this is a result of my age or current economic trends, but I figured I might as well organize my thoughts on the subject.

Generally, the renting vs buying debate goes something like this: renting is essentially throwing money down the drain, while buying builds equity and sets you on the path to financial freedom. Throw in some narratives about the American dream and some wishful thinking about home price appreciation, and owning is just always better.

This post will explore this argument through the economics of renting vs buying. Of course, there are non-economic factors that come into play. For example, buying a house might just make you happier or vice versa. Buying can provide the stability of knowing you can’t be kicked out by a landlord or have your rents raised dramatically. Buying allows you to customize your house the way you want it. Renting can provide the freedom and flexibility to change your life up at a moments notice. Renting can be less stressful, no headaches from repairing a roof or a water heater. These factors might even be more important than the by-the-numbers analysis. To each their own.

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Analysis: 2016 Reflections

Another new year is upon us, and it’s that time again to reflect on what went wrong since the last time we reflected on what went wrong. The goal is to relearn the same lesson we relearn every year: Nobody, including myself, has any idea how macroeconomic and sociopolitical events will play out, nor how they will affect the markets.

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Investment Theory #12: Buffett’s 1967 Letter

In 1956, Warren Buffett concluded his work for Benjamin Graham and returned to Omaha, where he started an investment partnership. This partnership was formed with seven limited partners, made up of family and friends, contributing $105,000, and Warren Buffet contributing $100. It grew over time.

This post continues my series about that partnership. The goal is to gain some insight into one of the most successful investment vehicles in modern history.

Links to past years can be found here: 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966

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Investment Theory #8: Buffett’s 1963 Letter

In 1956, Warren Buffett concluded his work for Benjamin Graham and returned to Omaha, where he started an investment partnership. This partnership was formed with seven limited partners, made up of family and friends, contributing $105,000, and Warren Buffet contributing $100. Over time it grew.

This post continues my series about that partnership. The goal is to gain some insight into one of the most successful investment vehicles in modern history.

Links to past years can be found here: 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962

Continue reading “Investment Theory #8: Buffett’s 1963 Letter”

Investment Theory #7: Michael Mauboussin

Michael J. Mauboussin is managing director and head of Global Financial Strategies at Credit Suisse, where he advises clients on valuation and portfolio positioning, capital markets theory, competitive strategy analysis, and decision-making. He is also an adjunct professor of finance at the Columbia Business School and chairman of the Board of Trustees at Santa Fe Institute.

Mauboussin started his career at Drexel Burnham Lambert of Michael Milken fame. He was trained to be a financial advisor and in his own words was an abject failure. Armed with the knowledge of what he wasn’t good at, he set out to find a job in equity research. He eventually landed a job as a packaged food analyst at First Boston, which later merged with Credit Suisse. He has been there ever since.

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Investment Theory #6: Buffett’s 1962 Letter

In 1956, Warren Buffett concluded his work for Benjamin Graham and returned to Omaha, where he started an investment partnership. This partnership was formed with seven limited partners, made up of family and friends, contributing $105,000, and Warren Buffet contributing $100. Over time it grew.

This post continues my series about that partnership. The goal is to gain some insight into one of the most successful investment vehicles in modern history.

Links to past years can be found here: 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961

Continue reading “Investment Theory #6: Buffett’s 1962 Letter”