Investment Theory #17: Berkshire Hathaway’s 1978 Letter

In 1962, Warren Buffett began purchasing shares of Berkshire Hathaway – a downsizing textile manufacturing company. In 1965, after feeling slighted by management, Buffett acquired control of Berkshire. Shortly after, Berkshire purchased an insurance company and began using its float to fund investments and acquisitions. Using this as a launching pad, Berkshire’s share price rose from $8 in 1962 to $276,800 in 2017 (20% annualized).

This post continues our series on that performance. Our goal is to gain some insight into one of the most successful investment vehicles in history. Warren Buffett’s shareholder letters can be found here.

Links to Berkshire’s past years: 1977

Links to Buffett’s partnership years: 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968

Continue reading “Investment Theory #17: Berkshire Hathaway’s 1978 Letter”

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Investment Theory #16: Berkshire Hathaway’s 1977 Letter

In 1962, Warren Buffett began purchasing shares of Berkshire Hathaway – a textile manufacturing company in the process of downsizing. In 1965, after feeling slighted by management, Buffett acquired control of Berkshire. In 1967, Berkshire purchased an insurance company and began using its float to fund investments. Through acquisitions and investments, Berkshire’s share prices would appreciate from $8 in 1962 to $276,800 in 2017 (20% annualized).

This post begins my series on Berkshire Hathaway. The goal is to gain some insight into one of the most successful companies in modern history. We will be looking at Warren Buffett’s shareholder letters which can be found here.

Links to Buffett’s partnership years: 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968

Continue reading “Investment Theory #16: Berkshire Hathaway’s 1977 Letter”

Analysis: NOW Inc. (NYSE: DNOW)

Now Inc. (NYSE: DNOW) hit $11.85 today and I began to build a position. This document contains an independent analysis of the company. Information on my investment philosophy can be found here.

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Book Review: Competition Demystified

In Competition Demystified, Bruce Greenwald and Judd Kahn simplify Michael Porter’s five forces framework (threat of new entrants, threat of substitutes, customer bargaining power, supplier bargaining power, industry rivalry) into a single force from which all others derive: barriers to entry. According to the authors, there are three sources of this competitive advantage:

  1. Supply Advantages: Lower input costs, proprietary technology, complicated processes, etc.
  2. Demand Advantages: Captive customers, habitual products, high switching costs, high search costs, network effects.
  3. Economies of Scale: High fixed costs spread across high market share.

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Investment Theory #21: Klarman’s 1999 Letter

I’ve been awol while studying for the CFA. With level 3 hopefully behind me, I’m going to get back into the habit of writing. Let’s jump back into our series on the 1990’s with Seth Klarman’s letters as our guide to the period.

Klarman is a well-respected value investor who founded the Baupost Group in 1982. Since then he has generated an average annual return of 19%. Klarman’s investing philosophy can be summed up by the title of his book Margin of Safety: Risk-Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor.

This series of posts will reflect on Klarman’s activity during the period 1995 to 2001. Links to past posts: 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998

Continue reading “Investment Theory #21: Klarman’s 1999 Letter”

Investment Theory #20: Klarman’s 1998 Letter

Lately, it appears a fresh wave of animal spirits has gripped the markets — just look at the post-election rally in equities. Investors seem to have bought into the narrative that tax cuts and deregulation will jump-start the economy, while at the same time ignoring the risks inherent in an “America-First” protectionist agenda.

In times of market loftiness, it serves us well to reexamine how similar cycles have played out in the past, and there is probably no better case study than Seth Klarman’s handling of the late 1990s. Klarman is a well-respected value investor who founded the Baupost Group in 1982. Since then he has generated an average annual return of 19%. Klarman’s investing philosophy can be summed up by the title of his book Margin of Safety: Risk-Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor.

This series of posts will reflect on Klarman’s activity during the period 1995 to 2001. Links to past posts: 1995, 1996, 1997

Continue reading “Investment Theory #20: Klarman’s 1998 Letter”

Investment Theory #19: Klarman’s 1997 Letter

Lately, it appears a fresh wave of animal spirits has gripped the markets — just look at the post-election rally in equities. Investors seem to have bought into the narrative that tax cuts and deregulation will jump-start the economy, while at the same time ignoring the risks inherent in an “America-First” protectionist agenda.

In times of market loftiness, it serves us well to reexamine how similar cycles have played out in the past, and there is probably no better case study than Seth Klarman’s handling of the late 1990s. Klarman is a well-respected value investor who founded the Baupost Group in 1982. Since then he has generated an average annual return of 19%. Klarman’s investing philosophy can be summed up by the title of his book Margin of Safety: Risk-Averse Value Investing Strategies for the Thoughtful Investor.

This series of posts will reflect on Klarman’s activity during the period 1995 to 2001. Links to past posts: 1995, 1996

Continue reading “Investment Theory #19: Klarman’s 1997 Letter”